Buckeye, Arizona

Buckeye, Arizona is the western most suburb of Phoenix, 30 miles away. Largely an agricultural area, it is developing, as suburban areas tend to do. But, agriculture remains one of the dominant uses of land in the area, as depicted in the short aerial drone video above.

“Agriculture is not crop production as popular belief holds – it’s the production of food and fiber from the world’s land and waters. Without agriculture it is not possible to have a city, stock market, banks, university, church or army. Agriculture is the foundation of civilization and any stable economy.” – Allan Savory


 

Red Rock Landscapes of Sedona, Arizona

A picture postcard sample of the stunning red rock landscapes  found in the Sedona, Arizona area. Scroll down to view an audio-visual slideshow of this geological wonderland.

red rock landscapes of sedona arizona

Sedona, Arizona, is a uniquely scenic area showcasing stunning geological formations, and the subject of many a photograph, by myriad photographers. While visiting a friend in Phoenix, I had a little time to drive around Sedona and capture some images. Sometimes, photography is about what you get, in terms of weather, lighting, time of day. In this case, I was offered a partially overcast sky with scattered clouds giving a nice, soft, diffused lighting effect.

“The deep red color for which Sedona is famous is due to the presence of hematite (iron oxide, otherwise known as rust) that stains the sandstone of the Schnebly Hill and Hermit Shale layers. The steepness of the terrain is due the fact that the top layers of the strata are composed of basalt and limestone, which are harder than the underlying sandstone. Water running off the edge of the escarpment eats away at the lower layers, creating the shear cliffs. Eventually enough soft material is weatherd away that it undercuts the cap layer, which subsequently breaks off in large slabs and falls into the canyons. This exposes new soft material and the process starts again, with the cliff face now twenty-odd feet further north than it was before.” –  Arizonaruins.com

The Red Rock Landscapes of Sedona, Arizona Audio-Visual Slideshow

A Piece Of The King’s Trail – Maui, Hawaii

Think not that early Hawaiians had no roads, for they indeed did; wide, solid and well built trails which could accommodate people, horses, livestock and the movement of goods from one location to another around the island. The King’s Trail, also known as The Hoapili Trail, at one time circumnavigated the island. Now, only sporadic remnants remain, and make for enjoyable hiking. The King’s Trail segment pictured here is a few miles long and begins at La Perouse Bay in south Maui.

For more comprehensive information on the King’s Trail, click the link below:

The King’s Trail

The Pokowai Sea Arch

The Pokowai sea arch on Maui’s southeastern shoreline, in the Nuu and Kaupo area, at the coastal base of Haleakala, the 10,000 dormant volcano, is a result of Haleakala’s past eruptions, as is the entire island. The Pokowai sea arch is a particularly striking feature and worth a visit to see. But, you won’t see it from the perspective of a flying camera; so, if you will, hop on the back of a small bug and fly around the Pokowai sea arch and view it from some different heights and angles….

The Panorama below shows not only the lava outcropping that is Pokowai sea arch, but the massive Manawainui Gulch. As one might imagine, when the rains are heavy, such as in a tropical storm, which are not uncommon in the summer months, the Manawainui Gulch is a lively flowing river. The word ‘manawainui’ translates as ‘large water branch.’

pokowai sea arch panorama


 

A May Morning at Kaenae Peninsula

The Ke’anae Peninsula was created from an immense lava flow originating from Haleakala Crater. Centuries ago Hawaiians brought soil down, by hand, from the mountains to create the Ke’anae Peninsula. Their amazing display of physical labor is a testament to how revered this land is in Hawaiian culture. It is no wonder so much history is found here! Historically, Ke’anae has been a taro producing Hawaiian village, and much of the land is in taro lo’i today. It is told that the dirt was brought down here basket-by-basket. This story may very well be true since the area is young lava rock, created quite recently (geologically speaking) in a massive flow from Haleakala. A traditional Hawaiian village, Ke’anae is today still known for its taro fields. This area attracts fisherman and photographers from all over the world looking to catch Maui’s famous North Shore waves against the beautiful Ke’anae peninsula.

According to the book “Maui – A History,” author C.E. Speakman tells the story of Captain Cook’s short visit to Maui in 1778. Though he never landed on the island, his ships, the Discovery and the Resolution, spent 2 days off the coast of Kahului trading with the native Hawaiians. When he left, he sailed down the north coast and was approached near Ke’anae by a double-hulled canoe. Aboard the canoe was the then ruler of the big island of Hawai’i, Kalaniopu’u accompanied by his nephew Kamehameha. The young warrior chief Kamehameha spent the night on Cook’s ship off the coast of Ke’anae taking in all the new technologies he saw on board.

A May Morning at Kaenae Peninsula Panorama

A May morning at Kaenae Peninsula

On April 1, 1946 the area was almost completely destroyed by a tsunami generated by an 8.6 magnitude earthquake off the coast of Alaska. Sadly this tiny low-lying village lost 20 children and four teachers to the massive 35′ waves. The small village of Ke’anae has a long, rich history going all the way back to the mythic origins of ancient Hawaii.  However, most of what you find on the peninsula today was built recently, after the 1946 tsunami that leveled everything on the peninsula.

A May Morning at Kaenae Peninsula Aerial Videography