Jacaranda Highway

Come have a view, both still and video, of Jacaranda Highway. In mid-spring, on the upcountry slopes of Haleakala, on Maui, Hawaii, Jacaranda tress blossom, along the two main highways which connect the various upcountry residents and communities together, and to the rest of the island. Their bluish purple flowers become an annual sight attracting painters, photographers, and lover’s of natural beauty. A drive through upcountry Maui can be delightful just about any time of the year; however, mid spring can be particularly enjoyable, because of the blossoming Jacarandas, turning an everyday road into Jacaranda Highway.

Jacaranda mimosifolia is a sub-tropical tree native to south-central South America that has been widely planted elsewhere because of its beautiful and long-lasting blue flowers. Jacaranda is a genus of 49 species of flowering plants in the family Bignoniaceae. Maui’s Jacaranda are not native. They are imported.

“The former mayor of Maui County was raised in Keokea—the final outpost on the twisting Kula Highway—where jacarandas first appeared. During the late 1950s, the Portuguese descendant and Speaker of the Hawaii House of Representatives persuaded the Territorial Highway Commission to plant jacarandas along the highways of Kula and Pukalani. Many speculate that it was Cravalho’s Portuguese-rancher ancestors who first introduced this royal tree, as jacarandas originated in Brazil (and are now found throughout Cuba, Northwest Argentina, Bolivia, Jamaica, the Bahamas, South Africa, and Australia). Fables from the Amazon tell of a priestess of the moon who descended from the (Jacaranda)tree before assimilating herself with local villagers, with whom she shared her bounty of wisdom and morals and showed them the difference between evil and good. Her work complete, she went back to the tree and floated to the skies above, where she was reunited with her soulmate—the child of the sun. Elder females within Amazonian tribes would gather residents underneath the shade of jacarandas—which is synonymous with order and knowledge—to dole out insights. And given the tree’s association with learning, colleges and universities around the globe have long featured jacarandas on their campuses—perhaps most notably so at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, where students know it’s time to crack down on studying when the petals fall to the ground (a spectacle that gave rise to the term Purple Panic). And within this lore? A boatload of additional myths—including the notion that one’s grade point average will fall by a point for each blossom that falls on their head. For Mauians, these 90-foot trees remind us of the power and promise of rebirth—and are as much of a part of our treasured landscape as the omnipresent palm tree.” (www.bikemaui.com/upcountry-maui-jacaranda)

On Maui, the Jacarandas may blossom early one year, late another, depending on the amount and dates of rain. This year the Jacarandas began their bloom in early April with those of lower elevations, and continued into May. The images in this post were all taken on April 15, 2017.

Along Jacaranda Highway in Upcountry Maui

Jacaranda Highway on the lower slopes of Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii

Enjoy a bird’s eye video view of Maui’s upcountry Jacaranda tree lined highway….


 

The Maui Sunflower Field

 

With the demise of the sugar plantations throughout Hawaii, and mot recently Maui, thoughts go towards alternative crops. One such crop are sunflowers which can be used not only to harvest sunflower seeds, but can also be used as bio-fuel, which is the main intention of Maui’s newest attraction, a sunflower field. It’s large, bright, blossoming flowers attract the eye, causing many to stop and look. To be in the field is as if to be surrounded by smiles….

Maui Sunflower Fields

 

Enjoy a bird’s eye view of the Maui sunflower field from the flying camera…


 

A March Morning Over Olowalu

 

Olowalu is a quaint, very small community on the southwest side of Maui, about halfway between the commercial center of Kahului and the  historically palatial retreat and tourist area of Lahaina. Olowalu has a rich history. Around 1790, there was a massacre there, today referred to by historians as Hawaii’s Wounded Knee. You can read about this rather significant historical event here.

The shoreline of Olowalu is home to a ‘mother reef.’ What that means is that the corals here at Olowalu release a type of spawn, which then floats on currents to the outlying islands and settles on distant reefs. The end result is new coral growth on dozens of different reefs. And, of course, the shipment of sugar from the local plantations requires a pier, the remnants of which remain today.

Olowalu also has a private campground, a small store, a restaurant and a food truck that sells fresh squeezed sugar cane juice. The snorkeling and diving here may be some of the best on Maui.

You can read more about the historical, cultural and environmental significance of Olowalu here.

An aerial view of Olowalu

 

Enjoy some sights of Olowalu through the lens of a flying video camera…..


 

More Scenic Northwest Maui

The northwest coastline of Maui is rugged and scenic; the views shown here in this post are simply not possible, without a helicopter, or a flying camera, with which these images were taken. Using a popular unmanned aerial system, it is now possible to fly out over the water, look back at the gorgeous, rugged, northwest shoreline, and capture images. It’s not the first post of this area. So, here are….

More Scenic Northwest Maui Views

more scenic northwest maui images


 

 

More Saguaro Cactus of the Sonoran Desert

Come fly with me around an area of the Sonoran Desert in southwestern Arizona, filled with Saguaro cactus…..

Here is more Saguaro cactus of the Sonoran Desert from my regular non-flying camera. In taking and reviewing these images, I inevitably find some that appear, to me, better having been filtered through a paint program, which provides a kind of surreal ‘flavor’ to the pictures. The Sonoron desert can be rather surreal and magical at times. These images in this post have all been so filtered.

Here are some more facts about the Saguaro….

The Saguaro Cactus is an incredible plant that has illustrated the abilities of evolution over the years of it’s existence. This page will give you a very basic overview of how the Saguaro Cactus lives, survives and grows in an environment that renders zero resources for survival.
more Saguaro Cactus of the Sonoran Desert
 
WHO AM I?
The Saguaro cactus is a large tree sized cactus that lives in the desert. Its defensive mechanisms can be considered both passive and aggressive. The aggressive mechanism is the countless amount of pointy spines all along the surface of the cactus.  The passive mechanism would be the fact that these cacti grow flowers at the base, or on their arms that provide seeds for the growing of the next generation of cacti.
 
WHERE DO I LIVE?
The Sonoran Desert in Arizona, the Mexican state of Sonora and Baja California in the San Felipe Desert. These cacti thrive in this environment being able to live off pretty much intolerable amounts of water. Normal plants are unable to survive in this same environment which is why you only see cacti like the Saguaro Cactus. 
 
WHAT DO I EAT?
The Saguaro leads a very dependent life, where it’s environment determines how the cactus will grow. Cacti in Tucson grow twice as fast as those in the drier western portion of Arizona. These cacti rely heavily on precipitation which determines the rate of growth for each cactus. The more water a cacti has, the more it will grow; which is why drier deserts produce less developed cacti, as opposed to wetter deserts producing more developed cacti.
 
HOW DO I LOOK?
I am tall and green with large spines, kind of like giant fingerprints all along my body. On these spines I have needles all along each spine. I also have many arms which help me to reproduce by giving me the ability to grow more flowers for reproduction.
 
HOW DO I REPRODUCE?
Some Saguaros can live up to 150 years, while it takes about 75 years just to grow a side arm. These arms are grown as an evolutionary mechanism to increase the plant’s reproductive capacity. The Saguaro cactus is the type of plant that requires cross pollination in order to reproduce. Saguaros can produce up to 40,000 seeds in their lifetime, but only one seed will live long enough to produce a new cactus; this is due to predation, drought and temperature extremes. Saguaros take very long to grow, where a 10 year old Saguaro can be as tall as 2 inches. The most known form of reproduction of plants refers to bees extracting nectar moving from flower to flower. As they collect nectar the sticky pollen attaches to the bees, then they go to the next flower and smear the pollen all over that flower as they are collecting the nectar. But for Saguaros, this pollination occurs at night, and instead of bees, its bats. Although doves and bees are seen doing most of the daytime pollination, bats do all of the night time and morning time pollination.