Buckeye, Arizona

Buckeye, Arizona is the western most suburb of Phoenix, 30 miles away. Largely an agricultural area, it is developing, as suburban areas tend to do. But, agriculture remains one of the dominant uses of land in the area, as depicted in the short aerial drone video above.

“Agriculture is not crop production as popular belief holds – it’s the production of food and fiber from the world’s land and waters. Without agriculture it is not possible to have a city, stock market, banks, university, church or army. Agriculture is the foundation of civilization and any stable economy.” – Allan Savory


 

The Pokowai Sea Arch

The Pokowai sea arch on Maui’s southeastern shoreline, in the Nuu and Kaupo area, at the coastal base of Haleakala, the 10,000 dormant volcano, is a result of Haleakala’s past eruptions, as is the entire island. The Pokowai sea arch is a particularly striking feature and worth a visit to see. But, you won’t see it from the perspective of a flying camera; so, if you will, hop on the back of a small bug and fly around the Pokowai sea arch and view it from some different heights and angles….

The Panorama below shows not only the lava outcropping that is Pokowai sea arch, but the massive Manawainui Gulch. As one might imagine, when the rains are heavy, such as in a tropical storm, which are not uncommon in the summer months, the Manawainui Gulch is a lively flowing river. The word ‘manawainui’ translates as ‘large water branch.’

pokowai sea arch panorama


 

A May Morning at Kaenae Peninsula

The Ke’anae Peninsula was created from an immense lava flow originating from Haleakala Crater. Centuries ago Hawaiians brought soil down, by hand, from the mountains to create the Ke’anae Peninsula. Their amazing display of physical labor is a testament to how revered this land is in Hawaiian culture. It is no wonder so much history is found here! Historically, Ke’anae has been a taro producing Hawaiian village, and much of the land is in taro lo’i today. It is told that the dirt was brought down here basket-by-basket. This story may very well be true since the area is young lava rock, created quite recently (geologically speaking) in a massive flow from Haleakala. A traditional Hawaiian village, Ke’anae is today still known for its taro fields. This area attracts fisherman and photographers from all over the world looking to catch Maui’s famous North Shore waves against the beautiful Ke’anae peninsula.

According to the book “Maui – A History,” author C.E. Speakman tells the story of Captain Cook’s short visit to Maui in 1778. Though he never landed on the island, his ships, the Discovery and the Resolution, spent 2 days off the coast of Kahului trading with the native Hawaiians. When he left, he sailed down the north coast and was approached near Ke’anae by a double-hulled canoe. Aboard the canoe was the then ruler of the big island of Hawai’i, Kalaniopu’u accompanied by his nephew Kamehameha. The young warrior chief Kamehameha spent the night on Cook’s ship off the coast of Ke’anae taking in all the new technologies he saw on board.

A May Morning at Kaenae Peninsula Panorama

A May morning at Kaenae Peninsula

On April 1, 1946 the area was almost completely destroyed by a tsunami generated by an 8.6 magnitude earthquake off the coast of Alaska. Sadly this tiny low-lying village lost 20 children and four teachers to the massive 35′ waves. The small village of Ke’anae has a long, rich history going all the way back to the mythic origins of ancient Hawaii.  However, most of what you find on the peninsula today was built recently, after the 1946 tsunami that leveled everything on the peninsula.

A May Morning at Kaenae Peninsula Aerial Videography


 

Jacaranda Highway

Come have a view, both still and video, of Jacaranda Highway. In mid-spring, on the upcountry slopes of Haleakala, on Maui, Hawaii, Jacaranda tress blossom, along the two main highways which connect the various upcountry residents and communities together, and to the rest of the island. Their bluish purple flowers become an annual sight attracting painters, photographers, and lover’s of natural beauty. A drive through upcountry Maui can be delightful just about any time of the year; however, mid spring can be particularly enjoyable, because of the blossoming Jacarandas, turning an everyday road into Jacaranda Highway.

Jacaranda mimosifolia is a sub-tropical tree native to south-central South America that has been widely planted elsewhere because of its beautiful and long-lasting blue flowers. Jacaranda is a genus of 49 species of flowering plants in the family Bignoniaceae. Maui’s Jacaranda are not native. They are imported.

“The former mayor of Maui County was raised in Keokea—the final outpost on the twisting Kula Highway—where jacarandas first appeared. During the late 1950s, the Portuguese descendant and Speaker of the Hawaii House of Representatives persuaded the Territorial Highway Commission to plant jacarandas along the highways of Kula and Pukalani. Many speculate that it was Cravalho’s Portuguese-rancher ancestors who first introduced this royal tree, as jacarandas originated in Brazil (and are now found throughout Cuba, Northwest Argentina, Bolivia, Jamaica, the Bahamas, South Africa, and Australia). Fables from the Amazon tell of a priestess of the moon who descended from the (Jacaranda)tree before assimilating herself with local villagers, with whom she shared her bounty of wisdom and morals and showed them the difference between evil and good. Her work complete, she went back to the tree and floated to the skies above, where she was reunited with her soulmate—the child of the sun. Elder females within Amazonian tribes would gather residents underneath the shade of jacarandas—which is synonymous with order and knowledge—to dole out insights. And given the tree’s association with learning, colleges and universities around the globe have long featured jacarandas on their campuses—perhaps most notably so at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, where students know it’s time to crack down on studying when the petals fall to the ground (a spectacle that gave rise to the term Purple Panic). And within this lore? A boatload of additional myths—including the notion that one’s grade point average will fall by a point for each blossom that falls on their head. For Mauians, these 90-foot trees remind us of the power and promise of rebirth—and are as much of a part of our treasured landscape as the omnipresent palm tree.” (www.bikemaui.com/upcountry-maui-jacaranda)

On Maui, the Jacarandas may blossom early one year, late another, depending on the amount and dates of rain. This year the Jacarandas began their bloom in early April with those of lower elevations, and continued into May. The images in this post were all taken on April 15, 2017.

Along Jacaranda Highway in Upcountry Maui

Jacaranda Highway on the lower slopes of Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii

Enjoy a bird’s eye video view of Maui’s upcountry Jacaranda tree lined highway….


 

The Maui Sunflower Field

 

With the demise of the sugar plantations throughout Hawaii, and mot recently Maui, thoughts go towards alternative crops. One such crop are sunflowers which can be used not only to harvest sunflower seeds, but can also be used as bio-fuel, which is the main intention of Maui’s newest attraction, a sunflower field. It’s large, bright, blossoming flowers attract the eye, causing many to stop and look. To be in the field is as if to be surrounded by smiles….

Maui Sunflower Fields

 

Enjoy a bird’s eye view of the Maui sunflower field from the flying camera…