The Pincushion Protea

The pincushion protea is a very popular cultivated flower on Maui. It is often included in floral arrangements. They can be readily viewed at several of the floral gardens throughout Hawaii. These particular pincushion protea were seem at Kula Lodge on the slopes of Maui’s Haleakala Volcano. The lodge, in addition to rooms and a restuarant, has a delightful garden with various flowering plants.

Kingdom: Plantae

Class: Angiospermae (Angiosperms: Flowering Plants – all Plants bearing flowers and covered seeds)

Subclass: Dicotyledoneae (Dicots, all Flowering Plants with seeds giving rise to two seed leaves)

Superorder: Rosidae (Rose Superorder: includes Rose, Pea, Gum, Holly, Spurge, Vine, Citrus, Geranium and Carrot Orders and Families)

Order: Proteales (containing Oleaster, Buckthorn and Protea Families, but more recently considered to be most closely related to other Families)

Family: Proteaceae (Protea Family)

Subfamily: Proteoideae (Proteoid Subfamily – with one flower per floral bract, also Grevilleoideae Subfamily – Banksias and Grevilleas – with two flowers per floral bract)

Tribe: Proteae (All African proteas, except Brabejum – this delimitation of 13 genera is probably incorrect, and some Australian genera probably belong here )

Subtribe: Proteainae (Hairy seeded proteas: Protea and Faurea, vs Featerbush and Pincushion Subtribes)

Genus: Protea (Sugarbushes, with about 120 species)

emerging pincushion protea

2017 Highlights

A compilation of images taken during 2017 presented as an audio-visual slide show….


 

Wailuku River Reclaimed

Formerly known as Iao Stream, Wailuku River is the traditional, historical and most appropriate name. It has taken many years of community activism to reclaim the name.

“The Hawaiʻi Board on Geographic Names unanimously voted last night to restore the name Wailuku River to the waterway that runs through ʻĪao Valley (May 28, 2015).”

“After many years of historical and cultural research along with knowledge shared by many kūpuna within the Nā Wai ʻEhā region, the original name of the stream is Wailuku River/Stream. On every single Hawaiian Kingdom Land Document dating back to the 1840s, maps, and even Hawaiian Language newspapers from the 1800s, the name is Wailuku River or in Hawaiian “Kahawai o Wailuku” Sometimes even known as “Kahawai Nui o Wailuku”. Following the installation of stream diversions by Wailuku Sugar Company in the late 1800s early 1900s, and the dewatering of the Wailuku Stream, the name was changed to ʻĪao Stream / River. For over 100 years, the stream has been what we deemed as “dead” for it no longer flowed from the mountain to the sea. After 10+ years of advocating for the restoration of our streams in Nā Wai ʻEhā, and the fact that many of them are now flowing mauka to makai, we believe (Hui o Nā Wai ʻEhā) that we should reclaim and restore the original name of this once great river, Wailuku River. The name ʻĪao as we know it, refers to the valley for which Wailuku River flows out of.”

The Wailuku River Reclaimed

Wailuku River


 

Keawakapu Beach

Keawakapu on the south shore of Maui is a beautiful stretch of white sand beach with clear blue waters and coral reefs ideal for swimming, snorkeling, kayaking and paddle boarding, not to mention a barefoot walk upon the shoreline sand….

Aerial drone photography now allows for easy access to video footage of any number of locations which would otherwise be practically unavailable. Enjoy this short 3 minute video of a popular Maui beach.


 

Buckeye, Arizona

Buckeye, Arizona is the western most suburb of Phoenix, 30 miles away. Largely an agricultural area, it is developing, as suburban areas tend to do. But, agriculture remains one of the dominant uses of land in the area, as depicted in the short aerial drone video above.

“Agriculture is not crop production as popular belief holds – it’s the production of food and fiber from the world’s land and waters. Without agriculture it is not possible to have a city, stock market, banks, university, church or army. Agriculture is the foundation of civilization and any stable economy.” – Allan Savory