Wailuku River Reclaimed

Formerly known as Iao Stream, Wailuku River is the traditional, historical and most appropriate name. It has taken many years of community activism to reclaim the name.

“The Hawaiʻi Board on Geographic Names unanimously voted last night to restore the name Wailuku River to the waterway that runs through ʻĪao Valley (May 28, 2015).”

“After many years of historical and cultural research along with knowledge shared by many kūpuna within the Nā Wai ʻEhā region, the original name of the stream is Wailuku River/Stream. On every single Hawaiian Kingdom Land Document dating back to the 1840s, maps, and even Hawaiian Language newspapers from the 1800s, the name is Wailuku River or in Hawaiian “Kahawai o Wailuku” Sometimes even known as “Kahawai Nui o Wailuku”. Following the installation of stream diversions by Wailuku Sugar Company in the late 1800s early 1900s, and the dewatering of the Wailuku Stream, the name was changed to ʻĪao Stream / River. For over 100 years, the stream has been what we deemed as “dead” for it no longer flowed from the mountain to the sea. After 10+ years of advocating for the restoration of our streams in Nā Wai ʻEhā, and the fact that many of them are now flowing mauka to makai, we believe (Hui o Nā Wai ʻEhā) that we should reclaim and restore the original name of this once great river, Wailuku River. The name ʻĪao as we know it, refers to the valley for which Wailuku River flows out of.”

The Wailuku River Reclaimed

Wailuku River


 

Keawakapu Beach

Keawakapu on the south shore of Maui is a beautiful stretch of white sand beach with clear blue waters and coral reefs ideal for swimming, snorkeling, kayaking and paddle boarding, not to mention a barefoot walk upon the shoreline sand….

Aerial drone photography now allows for easy access to video footage of any number of locations which would otherwise be practically unavailable. Enjoy this short 3 minute video of a popular Maui beach.


 

Buckeye, Arizona

Buckeye, Arizona is the western most suburb of Phoenix, 30 miles away. Largely an agricultural area, it is developing, as suburban areas tend to do. But, agriculture remains one of the dominant uses of land in the area, as depicted in the short aerial drone video above.

“Agriculture is not crop production as popular belief holds – it’s the production of food and fiber from the world’s land and waters. Without agriculture it is not possible to have a city, stock market, banks, university, church or army. Agriculture is the foundation of civilization and any stable economy.” – Allan Savory


 

The Pokowai Sea Arch

The Pokowai sea arch on Maui’s southeastern shoreline, in the Nuu and Kaupo area, at the coastal base of Haleakala, the 10,000 dormant volcano, is a result of Haleakala’s past eruptions, as is the entire island. The Pokowai sea arch is a particularly striking feature and worth a visit to see. But, you won’t see it from the perspective of a flying camera; so, if you will, hop on the back of a small bug and fly around the Pokowai sea arch and view it from some different heights and angles….

The Panorama below shows not only the lava outcropping that is Pokowai sea arch, but the massive Manawainui Gulch. As one might imagine, when the rains are heavy, such as in a tropical storm, which are not uncommon in the summer months, the Manawainui Gulch is a lively flowing river. The word ‘manawainui’ translates as ‘large water branch.’

pokowai sea arch panorama


 

A May Morning at Kaenae Peninsula

The Ke’anae Peninsula was created from an immense lava flow originating from Haleakala Crater. Centuries ago Hawaiians brought soil down, by hand, from the mountains to create the Ke’anae Peninsula. Their amazing display of physical labor is a testament to how revered this land is in Hawaiian culture. It is no wonder so much history is found here! Historically, Ke’anae has been a taro producing Hawaiian village, and much of the land is in taro lo’i today. It is told that the dirt was brought down here basket-by-basket. This story may very well be true since the area is young lava rock, created quite recently (geologically speaking) in a massive flow from Haleakala. A traditional Hawaiian village, Ke’anae is today still known for its taro fields. This area attracts fisherman and photographers from all over the world looking to catch Maui’s famous North Shore waves against the beautiful Ke’anae peninsula.

According to the book “Maui – A History,” author C.E. Speakman tells the story of Captain Cook’s short visit to Maui in 1778. Though he never landed on the island, his ships, the Discovery and the Resolution, spent 2 days off the coast of Kahului trading with the native Hawaiians. When he left, he sailed down the north coast and was approached near Ke’anae by a double-hulled canoe. Aboard the canoe was the then ruler of the big island of Hawai’i, Kalaniopu’u accompanied by his nephew Kamehameha. The young warrior chief Kamehameha spent the night on Cook’s ship off the coast of Ke’anae taking in all the new technologies he saw on board.

A May Morning at Kaenae Peninsula Panorama

A May morning at Kaenae Peninsula

On April 1, 1946 the area was almost completely destroyed by a tsunami generated by an 8.6 magnitude earthquake off the coast of Alaska. Sadly this tiny low-lying village lost 20 children and four teachers to the massive 35′ waves. The small village of Ke’anae has a long, rich history going all the way back to the mythic origins of ancient Hawaii.  However, most of what you find on the peninsula today was built recently, after the 1946 tsunami that leveled everything on the peninsula.

A May Morning at Kaenae Peninsula Aerial Videography